Nanny Orientation

daycare_kids_bubblesAfter you’ve hired your new nanny, gotten the terms of employment and work agreement squared away, and prepared your home for a live-in nanny, it’s time for her to start work. Giving her some time to get oriented is very important. Many bad experiences between nannies and employers could have been avoided if the nanny had been given a thorough orientation. Allow a half day to a full day for a live-out nanny and two days for a live-in nanny for orientation. The orientation should include:

  • Giving her a key to the house
  • Showing her where a spare key is hidden in case she is locked out
  • Emergency phone numbers
  • Written authorization if she is allowed to transport  your children in a car
  • Showing her any quirky locks or appliances
  • Showing her how to work the alarm system,  if you have one
  • Introducing her to neighbors or any other people she may need
  • How to handle medical situations, who to call, what she is allowed to do on her own
  • Review safety information (answering the door, turning off the water, fuse box location, etc.)
  • If you want her to keep a daily log of activities, go over with her what you’d like included
  • How you’ll reimburse her expenses (keeping receipts, recording expenses, etc.)

Since there is a lot to go over, you might want to make a checklist of the things you want to cover with the nanny. The amount of information may be overwhelming for her as well, so the more you can put in writing, for her to review later, the better.

The nanny’s orientation is a good time to get the children and the nanny used to each other, and for you to observe the nanny’s interactions with them.

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